After Badpenny’s cellmate, Scandell spoke with the prosecuting attorney about

After Badpenny’s cellmate, Scandell spoke with the prosecuting attorney about testifying against Badpenny in exchange for leniency on some of her charges, the prosecuting attorney drafted a plea agreement and sent it to Liddy’s office.  The prosecuting attorney will use Scandell’s testimony if this case goes to trial.  However, the prosecuting attorney would prefer to avoid a trial altogether and save the taxpayers some money by settling this case with a plea agreement.  When drafting the plea agreement, the prosecuting attorney took into account that Badpenny has no prior criminal history. 

Liddy Gate, Badpenny’s attorney, met with Badpenny in the jail and presented her with a plea agreement offer drawn up by the prosecuting attorney.  Liddy, said, “Badpenny, this is a good deal and probably the best you will get from the prosecution. Especially in light of the recent events with Scandell who will testify against you and then in court it becomes your word against hers.”

Badpenny said, “But Scandell is lying can’t you do something about her testifying against me, are there not laws that prevent this from happening?”

Liddy responded, “Even though Scandell is lying; I believe it will damage your chances of avoiding prison time with a jury.  I recommend you look over the plea agreement and truly consider it as an option.”

Badpenny agreed to look at the plea agreement and read the terms out-loud in front of Liddy. “I am to wear a GPS ankle bracelet for 5-years for the possession of methamphetamine charge, which will run concurrent with my official misconduct charge, and the prosecution will drop the possession of drug paraphernalia charge.  I then will have to report to a probation officer twice a month during the five years, maintain employment, no negative contact with the police, and I cannot associate with any known felons.” Badpenny asks, “Does this include my boyfriend, Mitch Dreadford?”

Liddy, replies, “Yes, and if you agree to this plea agreement, I can get you in front of the judge this afternoon, and you would be out of jail by early this evening.  However, once you get released, I will have to drive you to Community Corrections where you will get fitted for your GPS ankle bracelet and then I can drop you off at home.”

Badpenny replies, “Well I am tired of being in jail and if this is the best deal you think I will get, then I will agree to the plea agreement.”

Assignment:

This week use the information from chapter 12 and complete a 2 to 3–page paper, discussing the different options a Community Correctional personnel will use to “promote rehabilitation for the client [the accused] and safety and security for the community” (Pollock, 2019, p. 389).  Explain the four different types of probation and parole officers described in our textbook; identify which one you believe would help Badpenny be successful during her five-year probationary period.  In addition, discuss some of the dilemmas that probation and parole officers face, and how selective enforcement regarding reporting infractions or revoking an offender’s release may not be ethical.